Affinity at Field

By Debario Fleming, Director of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

Affinity groups have been a cornerstone of community practice  at Field. The formation of these groups make space for students to share experiences, celebrate successes and express challenges.

At Field, we focus on continually growing as individuals and as a community. One aspect of this development is providing safe, intentional, and inclusive areas for students to engage in thoughtful and authentic conversations about relevant topics that individuals who identify similarly (race, ethnicity, religion, gender, or sexual orientation) might be encountering at school or in the larger community. Affinity groups have been a cornerstone of community practice  at Field. The formation of these groups make space for students to share experiences, celebrate successes and express challenges. We have been gradually introducing affinity groups and educating the community on the importance of this resource through ongoing activities and discussions. Additional affinity groups will begin meeting throughout November.

Field Affinity Groups are groups of people linked by a common identity, interest or purpose. These groups will meet multiple times per month and will be moderated by a faculty member of like affinity. Please know that affinity groups are intentional spaces that are inclusive of the identity listed. Field’s affinity groups for the 2021-22 school year include these. Throughout the year, these groups may shift due to interest levels within our student community.

To kick-off the reintroduction of affinity groups, we engaged students in connection and reflection activities, leading them into a shared understanding and appreciation of the benefits of affinity spaces. The “Skills to Juggle” activity was an opportunity for the students to actively engage with one another around something they can all relate to—having to juggle multiple things in their lives. This activity highlighted our understanding of the many responsibilities our students are managing daily. One student reflected that sometimes, balls from other groups entered their group’s space and he made the wise connection of how something that someone else is dealing with can impact them.



If the idea of affinity space is new to you or if you have particular questions this document from Rosetta Lee, a consultant, educator, and activist in Seattle, Washington, is a good reference. If you have additional questions please contact Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Director Debario Fleming.
Back